BOUTIQUE HOTEL FLOOR PLAN : FLOOR PLAN


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Boutique Hotel Floor Plan





boutique hotel floor plan






    boutique hotel
  • A small stylish hotel, typically one situated in a fashionable urban location

  • (Boutique hotels) Small unique hotels that are distinguished by their level of personalised service and individual style, p407.

  • Boutique hotel is a term popularized in North America and the United Kingdom to describe intimate, usually luxurious or quirky hotel environments.

  • (Boutique Hotels) This term refers to any hotel with less than 50 rooms. Originally, Boutique Hotels were small establishments possessing a high element of creativity, and their owners, often designers or second hand goods dealers, would leave the decorative objects in the rooms up for sale.





    floor plan
  • A scale diagram of the arrangement of rooms in one story of a building

  • scale drawing of a horizontal section through a building at a given level; contrasts with elevation

  • In architecture and building engineering, a floor plan, or floorplan, is a diagram, usually to scale, showing the relationships between rooms, spaces and other physical features at one level of a structure.

  • (Floor planning) Floorplanning is the act of designing of a floorplan, which is a kind of bird's-eye view of a structure.











boutique hotel floor plan - Boutique and




Boutique and Chic Hotels in Paris


Boutique and Chic Hotels in Paris



Fifty-two of the most beautifully decorated and luxurious small hotels in Paris are profiled and photographed in this lush little guide. You’ll find bohemian hideaways, classic historic dwellings (often refreshed with contemporary d?cor), hip bed-and-breakfasts, and ultra cool classics with things to do and see and where to shop and stroll listed with each hotel.

The rooms at one designer hotel, decorated by couturier Christian Lacroix, are variations on the theme of the boudoir, with jewel-like colors and baroque-hip furnishings. Another has the highly civilized atmosphere of an 18-century townhouse, with antiques and chandeliers set off by stone walls and exposed beams. In another, guestrooms were originally artists’ studios, with views of a courtyard garden; the lobby/library/bar and dining room is housed in a 60-foot-high indoor tennis court built in the 17th century. You’ll find lodgings are sleek and modern, but always peaceful and welcoming. Each hotel is enchanting and romantic, the embodiment of the quintessential French “luxe, calme et volupt?.”










80% (10)





The Lowell, New York




The Lowell, New York





The Lowell, New York
28 East 63rd Street (between Madison and Park Avenues)
New York, NY 10021

Variegated brick facade
-----
Architect Henry S. Churchill is best known for his work in city planning, but he also took the time to design the Lowell, a luxury apartment. The Lowell was built by Leo Wise and opened in 1926. It was built as a seventeen-story apartment hotel, with a first floor restaurant and lobby, and upper floors divided into one and two bedroom suites. Its Art Deco / Modern facade is a distinguished design in brick and glazed terra cotta, which integrates the ground floor entrance with a flat, subtly detailed center section of the building and topping with a series of terraced setbacks on the upper floors.

The Upper East Side Historic District Designation Report from the 1980s described the 17-story building as utilitarian in overall conception but is enlivened by a handsome entry motif and variegated brick bonding patterns on the upper floors.

From the architecture to the service, this hotel today reflects discreet aristocratic and understated European elegance. With its significant 1920's exterior architecture, The Lowell Hotel is integral to the character of the Upper East Side Historic District.

Fouad Chartouni and his brother Nabil own the Lowell. They are Lebanese real estate investors and developers. Fouad Chartouni is president of Kensico Properties, a real-estate holding company in New York. He graduated from the American University of Beirut and received a master's degree in business from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a doctorate in economics from Columbia University. His father is a real-estate developer in Beirut.

The Chartouni's bought the 130-room Lowell in 1982 for $6 million. They spent 30 months and $25 million transforming it into an Art Deco extravaganza, taking their cue from its original look. The original name was kept in recognition of its rich history.

With understated European elegance and an intimate ambience, The Lowell New York is a boutique hotel offering 47 suites and 25 deluxe rooms. Each room features traditional architectural details, original art and antiques, opulent fabrics, and communication and entertainment state-of-the-art technology. Many of the suites feature private terraces as well as wood burning fireplaces.

In a 1986 New York Times article it mentions the hotels room rates were averaging $220 for a double room and $360 for a one-bedroom suite. The owner Fouad Chartouni indicated the hotel attracts a lot of elite film industry executives and CEOs from the major fashion design, publishing and financial worlds.

Celebrities like to hide out in the hotel. Madonna at one time lived in the hotel’s 1,000 square foot Manhattan Suite.

He said the hotel's occupancy has been over 80% since opening.

In 1975 the Grand Cafe opened at the Lowell Hotel. Its interior had Deco elegance and crystal chandeliers from Loews State theatre. By 1979 the restaurant was known as Christophers.

The Lobby is contiguous to the Post House Restaurant, the entrance of which is separated by an original 1920's door.

It was Alan Stillman With $5,000 of his own money and $5,000 borrowed from his mother, bought a bar he often visited, The Good Tavern at the corner of 63rd Street and First Avenue, and renamed it T.G.I. Friday. He sold his interest in the TGIF Fridays chain for $1 million to the Carlson Cos. in 1976. In 1977 Stillman opened the first Smith & Wollensky. In 1980 Stillman opened the Post House at the Lowell Hotel. Stillman still operates The Post House.

In 1993 Fouad Chartouni acquired the 114-room L’Ermitage Hotel in Beverly Hills, California for an estimated $12 million. Chartouni’s investment group, La Hotel Properties Inc., purchased the foreclosed property from Mission Viejo-based Independence One Bank of California. La Hotel Properties would invest $20 million in renovating and at one time considered changing its name to the Lowell – but did not.

In 2010 it was reported Nabil Chartouni, the Lowell Hotel owner was looking to refinance a $60 million mortgage on the 72-room hotel. RBS Greenwich Capital originated the existing 5-year $60 million mortgage in August 2005 for Chartouni’s Kensico Properties. In November 2010 HVS Capital served as exclusive financial advisor and assisted with the restructure and extension of a $60 million first mortgage for The Lowell New York.











The Lowell Hotel




The Lowell Hotel





The Lowell, New York
28 East 63rd Street (between Madison and Park Avenues)
New York, NY 10021

-----
Architect Henry S. Churchill is best known for his work in city planning, but he also took the time to design the Lowell, a luxury apartment. The Lowell was built by Leo Wise and opened in 1926. It was built as a seventeen-story apartment hotel, with a first floor restaurant and lobby, and upper floors divided into one and two bedroom suites. Its Art Deco / Modern facade is a distinguished design in brick and glazed terra cotta, which integrates the ground floor entrance with a flat, subtly detailed center section of the building and topping with a series of terraced setbacks on the upper floors.

The Upper East Side Historic District Designation Report from the 1980s described the 17-story building as utilitarian in overall conception but is enlivened by a handsome entry motif and variegated brick bonding patterns on the upper floors.

From the architecture to the service, this hotel today reflects discreet aristocratic and understated European elegance. With its significant 1920's exterior architecture, The Lowell Hotel is integral to the character of the Upper East Side Historic District.

Fouad Chartouni and his brother Nabil own the Lowell. They are Lebanese real estate investors and developers. Fouad Chartouni is president of Kensico Properties, a real-estate holding company in New York. He graduated from the American University of Beirut and received a master's degree in business from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a doctorate in economics from Columbia University. His father is a real-estate developer in Beirut.

The Chartouni's bought the 130-room Lowell in 1982 for $6 million. They spent 30 months and $25 million transforming it into an Art Deco extravaganza, taking their cue from its original look. The original name was kept in recognition of its rich history.

With understated European elegance and an intimate ambience, The Lowell New York is a boutique hotel offering 47 suites and 25 deluxe rooms. Each room features traditional architectural details, original art and antiques, opulent fabrics, and communication and entertainment state-of-the-art technology. Many of the suites feature private terraces as well as wood burning fireplaces.

In a 1986 New York Times article it mentions the hotels room rates were averaging $220 for a double room and $360 for a one-bedroom suite. The owner Fouad Chartouni indicated the hotel attracts a lot of elite film industry executives and CEOs from the major fashion design, publishing and financial worlds.

Celebrities like to hide out in the hotel. Madonna at one time lived in the hotel’s 1,000 square foot Manhattan Suite.

He said the hotel's occupancy has been over 80% since opening.

In 1975 the Grand Cafe opened at the Lowell Hotel. Its interior had Deco elegance and crystal chandeliers from Loews State theatre. By 1979 the restaurant was known as Christophers.

The Lobby is contiguous to the Post House Restaurant, the entrance of which is separated by an original 1920's door.

It was Alan Stillman With $5,000 of his own money and $5,000 borrowed from his mother, bought a bar he often visited, The Good Tavern at the corner of 63rd Street and First Avenue, and renamed it T.G.I. Friday. He sold his interest in the TGIF Fridays chain for $1 million to the Carlson Cos. in 1976. In 1977 Stillman opened the first Smith & Wollensky. In 1980 Stillman opened the Post House at the Lowell Hotel. Stillman still operates The Post House.

In 1993 Fouad Chartouni acquired the 114-room L’Ermitage Hotel in Beverly Hills, California for an estimated $12 million. Chartouni’s investment group, La Hotel Properties Inc., purchased the foreclosed property from Mission Viejo-based Independence One Bank of California. La Hotel Properties would invest $20 million in renovating and at one time considered changing its name to the Lowell – but did not.

In 2010 it was reported Nabil Chartouni, the Lowell Hotel owner was looking to refinance a $60 million mortgage on the 72-room hotel. RBS Greenwich Capital originated the existing 5-year $60 million mortgage in August 2005 for Chartouni’s Kensico Properties. In November 2010 HVS Capital served as exclusive financial advisor and assisted with the restructure and extension of a $60 million first mortgage for The Lowell New York.









boutique hotel floor plan








boutique hotel floor plan




The Good Hotel Guide 2011 Great Britain & Ireland






The Good Hotel Guide is the leading independent guide to hotels in Great Britain and Ireland. It is written for the reader seeking impartial advice on finding a good place to stay. Hotels cannot buy their entry as they do in most rival guides. No money changes hands, and the editors and inspectors do not accept free hospitality on their anonymous visits to hotels.

The Good Hotel Guide is the leading independent guide to hotels in Great Britain and Ireland. It is written for the reader seeking impartial advice on finding a good place to stay. Hotels cannot buy their entry as they do in most rival guides. No money changes hands, and the editors and inspectors do not accept free hospitality on their anonymous visits to hotels.










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